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Papberback Posse | The Good Girl Discussion Questions

Categories Bookworms, self care
The Good Girl discussion questions

The Good Girl discussion questionsWe have been very into psychological thrillers in our little book club lately, and that is certainly true for August’s book, The Good Girl.

And man did this one suck you in and then spit you right out.

I had a feeling something good was coming when you guys started posting in our FB group when you got to the end and the general consensus was very much like this comment: “I just finished – holy shit whoa!!”

Let’s just say, no one seems to have seen the ending coming and everyone seems to have been very satisfied with it.

But let’s stop talking around all of the twists and turns and jump right into them…

Please note: there are MAJOR spoilers ahead that will ruin the book for you if you haven’t finished it yet. Proceed with caution. 😉

  1. Initially Detective Hoffman wishes that he hadn’t been assigned the case of the missing Mia Dennett, and yet later, finds himself completely preoccupied by it. Are his motives fueled more by professional or personal desire? Do you think his character evolved during the course of the novel, or did he remain true to himself throughout?
  2. Do you think it was admirable for Colin Thatcher to forsake his own and his mother’s well being for a stranger, or should he have carried out the kidnapping plot as planned? Were his actions entirely selfless, or did his decision to save Mia also serve a selfish purpose?
  3. Dr. Rhodes suggests that Mia’s feelings for Colin were an example of Stockholm syndrome: a psychological situation in which a kidnapping victim forms a bond with his or her captor. Do you feel that Mia was suffering from Stockholm syndrome, or that the relationship she developed with Colin was authentic?
  4. At the end of the novel we learn that Mia arranged her own kidnapping to seek vengeance against her father for a neglectful upbringing. Do you feel that Mia was justified? What other actions could she have taken to get even with her father? Was his conduct as awful as Mia perceived it to be? What about her actions?
  5. After reading The Good Girl, who do you feel was the true victim (or victims) and the true conspirator? Have your opinions changed since beginning the novel, and if so, how?

Feel free to discuss these questions here or in our closed Facebook group (just request to be added and I’ll approve you as soon as I see it). We are always happy to have new book-loving friends in the group!

Jen is a freelance writer and girl mom from New York. When she’s not knee-deep in glittery crafts and girl talk, you can probably find her sprawled across her couch in the middle of a Netflix marathon with dark chocolate smeared on her face. The struggle is real.


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